Trump Demands Secretary of State Step Down

Gage Skidmore from Surprise, AZ, United States of America, CC BY-SA 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

(ConservativeFreePress.com) – On Wednesday, former President Donald Trump called for Maine’s Secretary of State, Shenna Bellows, to step aside from deciding on his eligibility to be on the ballot. This request is rooted in the 14th Amendment and Bellows’ past comments about the events of January 6 at the Capitol.

Maine’s process differs from other states in handling such matters. Here, the Secretary of State initially makes a decision, which can later be challenged in the state’s court.

Bellows, a member of the Democratic Party, is poised to make a ruling soon following three petitions questioning Trump’s eligibility. The contention arises from Trump’s lawyers pointing to Bellows’ tweets about January 6, where she labeled the event an insurrection.

The 14th Amendment disallows anyone from holding office if they have been involved in an insurrection after pledging to uphold the Constitution. Trump’s legal team argues that Bellows’ tweets indicate she has already formed an opinion about the allegations against Trump, which concern his role on January 6.

The debate includes references to Bellows’ social media posts made on the day Trump was acquitted in his second impeachment trial, which centered on the Capitol riot. In one tweet, Bellows commented on the Senate’s findings and the resilience of democracy following the January 6 events.

Additionally, Bellows’ post on the one-year anniversary of January 6, where she emphasized protecting election workers, is highlighted in Trump’s lawyers’ letter.

This issue of Trump’s ballot eligibility has become a national topic, with various states taking different stances. While Michigan’s highest court recently dismissed a similar 14th Amendment challenge, Colorado’s supreme court ruled Trump ineligible for its primary ballot, a decision that is anticipated to escalate to the U.S. Supreme Court soon.

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